Church Leaflets

A DIY Guide

  • Step 1: Message
    • It’s really important to think about what you want to say and how you want to relay your message
    • It’s worth considering as a first stage WHY you are producing a leaflet and your aims and objectives. In doing this you may realise that your message may be better conveyed using, for example, on site interpretation.
  • Step 2: Think about the aim of the leaflet
    1. Is the aim of the leaflet to tell people more about your church whilst they visit it?  Do you want visitors to have information in their hand as they walk around your site or only at particular points? If it is only at particular points then it may be more cost effective in the long run to produce interpretation boards. These are also easier to manage at an unmanned site where it may be difficult to keep leaflets well stocked. Will there be a benefit from people taking away your leaflet. Printing your contact details on the leaflet will mean that people may contact you in the future to donate money or volunteer their time.
    2. Is the aim of the leaflet to raise awareness of your church? If so you must think hard about the image that you want to portray and ensure that your leaflet stands out amongst other leaflets.
  • Step 3: Methods of Presentation
    • There are many ways to get the message across in a leaflet from the use of lots of images and minimal text to lots of text and minimal images.
    • Think about using diagrams and maps where appropriate and possible.
    • The subject matter will often dominate the style of the leaflet and if you think about it you will realise that certain types of information are more often than not presented in a similar format to meet the reader’s expectations.
    • The method of presentation and design that you choose should depend on your audience and it’s important to consider who this is or will be before moving forward in the creation of a leaflet.
  • Step 4: Think About Your Audience
    • Think hard about who the leaflet is aimed at and consider: age; special interest groups; social demographic groups; language (do you need versions in several different languages?); those with special needs (e.g. partially sighted).
    • More often than not you will want you leaflet to appeal to as wide a group as possible but design elements as well as the text can tailor the leaflet to make it appeal to a more specific target audience.
  • Step 5: Think About the Content of the Leaflet
    • Keep it simple! Most simple leaflets will include text and images. It is most likely that you will want your leaflet to appeal to as many people as possible so try and use simple plain English/Welsh and sentence structure so that your text flows well.
    • Depending on your aim, try to use descriptive words that will create images in people’s minds or inspire them to want to find out more about your church.
    • State the obvious! Remember to keep things basic and state the obvious. While working on a project it can be hard to remember to do just this, but just because you understand something don’t assume others will.  This is important event when a leaflet is aimed at a specific interest group because people will all have different levels of knowledge.
    • Try not to overcrowd the leaflet with text.  Choose a few key points and enlarge on these. Use text design elements such as headings or bullet points to clearly summarise points to avoid long explanations.
    • If you are planning to use both leaflets and on-site interpretation boards use the boards to give longer explanations and use the leaflet to guide people to the boards and as a ‘teaser’ to give people a taste of what is to come. You want people to experience your site and not be pre-occupied by reading a complicated leaflet.
    • Choose appropriate images and ensure that you get them scanned in at a high resolution if you are going to have the leaflet professionally printed. Acceptable resolutions are between 300 and 600 dpi (dots per inch). Often photo discs produced when you get photos developed will scan images at a very large ‘size’ (approx 60 cm) but at 72dpi which is the resolution used to view images on a screen. It is usually OK to use these images if they are to be reduced in size on the leaflet. A 72dpi images printed at actual size will appear out of focus and ‘pixellated’.
    • Images to be printed by a professional printer will need to be in a CMYK format rather than RGB, which is the colour method used for screen display. If in doubt get your printer of a local designer to arrange all of the design work for you.
    • The use of maps within leaflets requires careful consideration and extra time to research as all mapping that is drawn by the Ordnance Survey or based on Ordnance Survey mapping (traced or redrawn to scale by you) needs to be licensed by the Ordnance Survey. It is advisable to contact the OS before proceeding too far with a project, as they will then be able to advise you as to whether a fee will be charged. Please be aware that the OS do monitor printed literature and will prosecute if a licence has not been applied for. OS contact details as follows:
  • Step 6: Deciding on the Design & Layout
    • The best way to get an idea of how you want your leaflet to look is to go to a Tourist Information Centre and Collect the leaflets that you like.  Don’t be afraid to ‘borrow’ design elements from various leaflets to get the right image for you. Often it is the most simple of designs that work the best. There is a lot of value in ‘white spaces’ within a design which can make the leaflet a lot clearer and give a fresh appearance.
    • Think about sizes and layout. 1/3 A4 leaflets fit into many standard leaflet racks and the other regular size for a leaflet is A5.
    • Think about how people will use the leaflet. Often people look at the front and then start reading the right inside page first so they are likely to miss information that is positioned on the inside of the front cover. Often with design elements you can subliminally encourage people to read the information in the order that you have planned.
    • Typefaces. When designing a leaflet try to choose and stick to a maximum of two typefaces or fonts. Often a pleasing effect can be achieved by choosing a serifed font and a non serifed (sans serif) font, but it is down to the individual designer.  Make use of symbol typefaces such as ‘wingdings’ to give more interesting bullet points.
    • Think about how the text is aligned on the page. Often justification can give a tidier appearance to a column of text. Think about whether you wish to centre headings.
    • Think about whether you want to use full colour in your leaflet or just one or two ‘spot’ colours. Remember you do not need to use ‘black and white’ you can choose any colours that work well together and print on coloured paper. Images can be tinted in one of the colours you wish to use. When getting a leaflet professionally printed the use of one or two spot colours will be cheaper than a full colour print run.
  • Step 7: Budgeting and Printing Your Leaflet
    • A professionally printed run of leaflets will be quite costly so it is worth getting quotes from a few printers before you start your project.
    • Think how many leaflets you will need. This will probably be dominated by where you will be distribution your leaflet and/or how many people will be likely to visit your Church.
    • Large print runs will seem daunting and it is important to consider whether you have room to store boxes of leaflets.  However, the set up costs will be high for the first print run so it’s worth getting a large number printed if you will be able to distribute them. This also lowers the unit cost of each leaflet.
    • Decide on the specification of your leaflet and either work up the design yourself (if you feel confident), or approach a printer who will be able to put you in touch with a designer (alternatively contact a designer who will work with a printer).
    • If you are meeting a designer take a few examples of leaflets that you like to help them visualise what you require. Also prepare the final text and take along any images you want to use in your leaflet (finalising the text beforehand will save you money as many designers will charge extra for changes to the text once the design has been laid out).
    • Check what the designer will do for the fee and make sure that you will be the ‘owner’ of the work for copyright reasons in case you want to make changes to the design in the future and decide to use a different designer.
    • Your designer and printer will take you through the rest of the process. There is nothing more nerve wracking yet exciting as getting your first leaflet back from the printers. Good Luck!
    • Cheaper alternatives – if you only require a short print run then why not design the leaflet yourself using a desktop publishing package. ‘Microsoft Publisher’ which is relatively easy to use and comes with ‘Wizard’ to help run you through the basics and a selection of clipart to help you illustrate your leaflet.  Digital cameras now make it easy to get images on your screen without the need for a scanner. These can then be printed off as required on a home printer or could be colour copied.